Book Review Throne of Glass. ✨🗡👑

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by Sarah J. Maas.

  • Published: 02-08-2012
  • Formant: hardback
  • Edition: 1st
  • Extent: 432
  • Imprint: Bloomsbury

Synopsis:

After serving out a year of hard labor in the salt mines of Endovier for her crimes, 18-year-old assassin Celaena Sardothien is dragged before the Crown Prince. Prince Dorian offers her her freedom on one condition: she must act as his champion in a competition to find a new royal assassin. Her opponents are men—thieves and assassins and warriors from across the empire, each sponsored by a member of the king’s council. If she beats her opponents in a series of eliminations, she’ll serve the kingdom for three years and then be granted her freedom. Celaena finds her training sessions with the captain of the guard, Westfall, challenging and exhilarating. But she’s bored stiff by court life. Things get a little more interesting when the prince starts to show interest in her… but it’s the gruff Captain Westfall who seems to understand her best. Then one of the other contestants turns up dead… quickly followed by another. Can Celaena figure out who the killer is before she becomes a victim? As the young assassin investigates, her search leads her to discover a greater destiny than she could possibly have imagined.

Review:

We are located in Adarlan, a kingdom that some years ago had magic. The key word was, because there is no trace of the beings that inhabited the forests or the books that transmitted knowledge. The king sent them to destroy. In this remote realm there is a girl named Celaena, known for being the greatest murderer of the kingdom. From her earliest childhood she was educated to become that, but at seventeen she was caught – after killing many, many people – and sent to Endovier, a prison where she must work in the salt mines. The life expectancy of those who are converted into slaves is a few months, but Celaena has been there for a year. A year of hard work all day, until they appear in front of it with a proposal: if it beats twenty-three men in a competition will become the real champion, which would amount to four years fulfilling the tasks that the King will devote to her , and then freedom.

But it’s not all that easy. The men you must overcome are murderers, thieves and warriors, men who are willing to do everything, because the competition is to life or death. She is not afraid, for something won the title: the murderer of Adarlan.With what he did not count on part of the competition is to have the Crown prince, Dorian, continually provocándola. The captain of the guard, Chaol, protects her and throws small pulls to equal parts. She makes friends with a princess who comes from faraway lands and also tries to survive something dark and evil that nests in the castle. You must find the source of evil if you want to win the competition and stay alive.

First we have Celaena. The undisputed protagonist of the book. She is an eighteen-year-old girl who spent the last year of her life working as a slave in the salt mines, in Endovier. He ended up there to kill a lot of people, which earned him the title of the murderer of Adarlan, although no one knows for sure that it is her.He is a very strong character with a lot of courage and a character that freezes. He didn’t have time to be otherwise, they didn’t let her. At the age of eight, the king of the assassins took it under his tutelage-after his parents died-to teach him himself all about the distinguished art of killing. At first he was afraid that he would be ruthless and he cared nothing-something like Adelina in the elite youth-but fortunately as the book progresses we see that she has suffered and still feels able to show emotions and feel them.

Chaol is the captain of the guard, and yes, I liked a little more than Dorian, is very determined to be very faithful to his convictions and beliefs and I think it is a strong point. When it comes to reading characters so I feel inspired, because sometimes it is not easy to stand firm and faithful to ideologies-however wrong they are.Dorian is the Crown prince, and Celaena should hate him for all he entails and for being the son of the man who sent her prey, but finds that hating him is not as easy as it seems. His character caught me at times, and I was disenchanted when I wanted more, it’s kind of hard to explain. Having the power it has, I felt that at times I could do more, but there is still a lot of history to read, a lot of fabric to cut, and I look forward to seeing how it evolves in other books.

Rating

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The author’s way of narrating surprised me very much, and for the better. With only one book he managed to fall in love with his prose and the way he wrote. It’s a pretty impressive thing, considering how demanding I am about writing style. does not skimp on details for more sordid than they are, tells the story crude and real, something much needed in this book.I think strong and determined characters, with an argument that I found very original. Female protagonists are always strong but good, never murder. Sarah J. Maas breaks the scheme and presents something totally new.The end I loved, but left me wanting more. Part of what happens in the outcome I saw it coming, because it was obvious that the story was going that way, but the other part left me thinking “what.” Yes, in capital letters. It gives a rather interesting storyline and is not limited to tell everything about one, gives us brushstrokes of what is going to be the second book. The only thing I could think of is that if many people describe this book as introductory, how it will be next, it has to be something totally wonderful, so I go with expectations through the clouds.

I’m so excited for the next book.

 

 

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